Interactive effects of different visual imagery perspectives and narcissism on motor performance

Ross Roberts, Nichola Callow, Lew Hardy, Tim Woodman, Laura Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two studies examined the interactive effects of different visual imagery perspectives and narcissism on motor performance. In both studies participants completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI-40: Raskin & Hall, 1979) and were assigned to either an internal visual imagery or external visual imagery group. Participants then performed a motor task (dart throwing in Study 1 and golf putting in Study 2) under conditions of practice, low self-enhancement, and high self-enhancement. Following completion of the respective tasks, participants were categorized into high and low narcissistic groups based on their NPI-40 scores. In both studies, high narcissists using external visual imagery significantly improved performance from the low to the high self-enhancement condition, whereas high narcissists using internal visual imagery did not. Low narcissists remained relatively constant in performance across self-enhancement conditions, regardless of perspective. The results highlight the importance of considering personality characteristics when examining the effects of visual imagery perspectives on performance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)499-517
JournalJournal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Volume32
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

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