Interpersonal relationship needs of virtual community participation: Afiro perspective

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Authors

External departments

  • Swansea University
  • Chinese University of Hong Kong

Details

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAssociation for Information Systems - 13th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2007
Subtitle of host publicationReaching New Heights
Place of PublicationRed Hook
PublisherNY Curran Associates, Inc.
Pages4351-4361
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781604233810
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes
Event13th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2007 - Keystone, CO, United States
Duration: 10 Aug 200712 Aug 2007

Publication series

NameAssociation for Information Systems - 13th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2007: Reaching New Heights
Volume7

Conference

Conference13th Americas Conference on Information Systems, AMCIS 2007
CountryUnited States
CityKeystone, CO
Period10/08/0712/08/07
Publication type

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Virtual communities (hereinafter as VCs) emerged as a new form of business model in electronic business field. Understanding motivations of members' participation is essential to virtual community organizers. Arguing that interpersonal relationship needs are important to drive members' participation, this paper used FIRO (Fundamental Interpersonal Relationship Orientation) as framework to explore why people participate in virtual communities. Data was collected in three large representative VCs and analyzed with ANOVA. It was found that people obtain information in virtual communities because they want to fulfill two kinds of needs-need for inclusion and need for affection; and people give information in virtual communities because they want to fulfill three types of needs-need for inclusion, need for control, and need for affection. This study thus contributed to the current knowledge of virtual communities by providing the integrative theoretical explanation and valid empirical results. This result is also meaningful to VC organizers.