Investigating the effect strength of positive risk-taking barriers on discharge decisions in occupational therapy intermediate care: A factorial survey

Craig Newman*, Phillip Whitehead, Mary Thomson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Positive risk-taking in occupational therapy intermediate care is a requirement yet little is known about how positive risk-taking barriers influence discharge decisions at different experience levels. Method. A factorial survey was used to investigate positive risk-taking barriers (i.e. Limited Capacity, Risk Averse Family, Blame Culture and No Support). Participants self-categorised their experience level into Novice or Semi-expert or Expert before analysing four vignettes relating to recommending a home discharge for an older adult. Data were analysed using Multiple Regression and One-Way Analysis of Variance. Results. 74 participants responded to 281 vignettes. The barriers that reduced the likelihood to recommend a home discharge for an older adult were ‘No Support’, Novices (β = -.315, p=0.002), Semi-experts (β = -.313, p=0.001) Experts (β = -.254, p=0.009); ‘Limited Capacity’, Novices (β = -.305, p<0.003), Semi-experts (β = -.254, p=0.006) Experts (β = -.376, p=0.001) and ‘Blame Culture’ Semi-experts (β = -.240, p=0.010). Novices were found to be less likely to recommend a home discharge by comparison. Conclusion. The ‘Limited Capacity’, ‘No Support’ and ‘Blame Culture’ barriers had the strongest effect and Novices were less likely to recommend a home discharge overall. These findings could inform future research and pre-registration Occupational Therapy education.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Occupational Therapy
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 8 Nov 2022

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