Is it a Crime to Produce Ecological Disorganization? Why Green Criminology and Political Economy Matter in the Analysis of Global Ecological Harms

Michael Lynch, Michael Long, Kimberly Barrett, Paul Stretesky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We argue in this paper for a political economic approach to the study of global ecological crimes. Green criminological studies often employ case study approaches which help explain a particular green crime; however, these studies lack a coherent theoretical basis. Based on ecological Marxism and treadmill of production approaches, we outline a theoretical approach for green criminology that focuses on crimes of ecological disorganization—that is, green harms that are the result of organizing the productive forces of the economy in a manner that is consistent with capitalism. We conclude that, to truly understand and remedy green harms, a focus on political economy is necessary.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)997-1016
JournalBritish Journal of Criminology
Volume53
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

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