It’s in their nature to nurture: a comparison of PCE mentors’ perception of their role and the emerging national requirements

Sue Wallace, Liz Atkins

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

This paper explores the ways in which subject specialist mentors perceive their role – and thereby their professional development needs - in terms of their responsibility for the observation of teaching practice in post-compulsory education settings. It suggests that their role as the mentors perceive it is not consistent with, or limited to, that which is implied in the emerging model of post-compulsory teacher training. Its findings further suggest that the training available for professionals undertaking this largely unpaid role is both limited and variable and that there is minimal engagement with the support which is available. The paper argues that a lack of coherence has led to an inequitable situation where students on post-compulsory Initial Teacher Training (ITT) courses receive variable support which impacts on their student experience and professional development. The investigation, based on a range of initiatives, resources and approaches developed during 2005/2006 as part of a DfES pilot study involving Nottingham Trent University (NTU), Lincoln College and Stamford College, makes recommendations for developments in local and national practice, and in government policy.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2006
EventBritish Education Research Association (BERA) Annual Conference - Warwick
Duration: 1 Sep 2006 → …
http://https://www.bera.ac.uk/

Conference

ConferenceBritish Education Research Association (BERA) Annual Conference
Period1/09/06 → …
Internet address

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