Keeping in touch with technology: the potential of robotic therapy for upper limb rehabilitation following stroke

Andrew Stephenson, John Stephens

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

The rapid pace of technological development has an ever-increasing influence on contemporary society. In recent years, healthcare policy in the United Kingdom has placed an emphasis on individualised care, the use of technology and the impact of long-term conditions across the population. While the use of robotic therapy can positively influence the recovery of arm function, in terms of motor impairment following stroke in acute and particularly in chronic stages of rehabilitation, evidence supporting impacting on activities of daily living is not clear. Robotic therapy should be understood in the context of not being a replacement for physiotherapy, and this article seeks to provide an overview of how it can offer a safe, effective and efficient adjunct to rehabilitation in the upper limb following stroke.
Original languageEnglish
Pages30-35
Number of pages6
No.168
Specialist publicationinTouch, the Journal for Physiotherapists in Private Practice
PublisherPhysio First
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2019

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Keeping in touch with technology: the potential of robotic therapy for upper limb rehabilitation following stroke'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this