Leadership After Virtue: MacIntyre's Critique of Management Reconsidered

Matthew Sinnicks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)
10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

MacIntyre argues that management embodies emotivism, and thus is inherently amoral and manipulative. His claim that management is necessarily Weberian is, at best, outdated, and the notion that management aims to be neutral and value free is incorrect. However, new forms of management, and in particular the increased emphasis on leadership which emerged after MacIntyre’s critique was published, tend to support his central charge. Indeed, charismatic and transformational forms of leadership seem to embody emotivism to a greater degree than do more Weberian, bureaucratic forms of management; hence, MacIntyre’s central contention about our emotivistic culture seems to be well founded. Having criticised the details but defended the essence of MacIntyre’s critique of management, this paper sketches a MacIntyrean approach to management and leadership by highlighting the affinities between MacIntyre’s political philosophy and Greenleaf’s concept of servant leadership.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)735-746
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume147
Issue number4
Early online date29 Nov 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2018

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