Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Spicular Jet Propagation Applied to Lower Solar Atmosphere Model. II. Case Studies with Tilted Jets

Fionnlagh Mackenzie Dover, Rahul Sharma, Robertus Erdélyi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Abstract: We report on numerical simulations of a propagating momentum pulse, representing an inclined jet structure in a stratified lower solar atmosphere model. Here, the numerical jets were generated via injection of a momentum pulse misaligned with the radial magnetic field, which resulted in a collimated structure that mimicked the observed inclined jet features in the chromosphere. The influence of inclination angle was examined for a variety of initial driver conditions (amplitude, period) and magnetic field magnitudes to identify their potential role in determining the morphological and dynamical characteristics of chromospheric jets. The numerical jets in our computational domain were consistent with the observed magnitudes of apex height and cross-sectional width for average inclination of chromospheric features. Furthermore, with an increasing misalignment between the momentum pulse and ambient magnetic field, the simulated structures showed a drop in the maximum apex height and length, while an increase in cross-sectional width magnitudes. Our numerical experiments also revealed the development of a pulse-like transverse motions in jets along with high density edges/nodes in the direction of jet displacement. It is postulated that dynamic kink instability might be responsible for the observed kinematic behavior of the inclined jet structures in the solar chromosphere.
Original languageEnglish
Article number88
Number of pages9
JournalThe Astrophysical Journal
Volume929
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2022

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Spicular Jet Propagation Applied to Lower Solar Atmosphere Model. II. Case Studies with Tilted Jets'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this