Mandatory reporting of child abuse-necessary medicine for 'nervous Nellies' or a remedy too far?

Marion Oswald*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In light of recent child abuse scandals, calls have been made for mandatory child abuse reporting to be introduced in the UK. The sharing of personal data is acknowledged as being crucial for the prevention and detection of child abuse; yet reluctance to share personal data has been a factor in recent failures to detect organised and institutional abuse. † The US, Australia and the Republic of Ireland all have mandatory reporting regimes. Much can be learned from their experiences including how these regimes have balanced privacy and confidentiality with the public interest in investigating child abuse. † Mandatory reporting however is no panacea; its success or failure will depend to a large extent on the wider information environment and the development of trust between agencies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)269-277
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Data Privacy Law
Volume3
Issue number4
Early online date20 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Mandatory reporting of child abuse-necessary medicine for 'nervous Nellies' or a remedy too far?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this