Medical and surgical nurses' experiences of modifying and implementing contextually suitable Safewards interventions into medical and surgical hospital wards

Lauretta Luck*, Kellie Kaczorowski, Melissa White, Geoffrey Dickens, Fiona McDermid

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aim: To explore general nurses' experiences of modifying and implementing contextually suitable Safewards interventions into medical and surgical hospital wards. Design: Qualitative action research was used working with nurses as co‐researchers. Methods: Pre‐implementation focus groups were conducted in April 2022 to understand and explore the current strategies nurses utilized to avert, respond to or decrease violence. Following this, two Safewards interventions were modified by the nurses on the wards. Post‐implementation focus groups were conducted in October 2022, to explore the nurses' experience of implementing Safewards interventions and the effect on their nursing practice. Data were analysed using Braun and Clarke's framework for thematic analysis. Results: Three themes emerged from the analysis of the pre‐implementation focus groups that reflected the type of violence experienced by these nurses and the context within which they occurred: ‘the space is hectic’; ‘it can feel like a battlefield’; and ‘the aftermath’. These themes encompass the nurses' experience of violence from patients and their visitors. Following the implementation of two modified Safewards interventions, the analysis of the focus groups reflected a change in nursing skills to avert or respond to violence: ‘Safewards in action’; ‘empathy and self‐reflection’; and ‘moving forward’. Conclusion: Safewards interventions can be successfully modified and used in general hospital wards and influence nursing practice to manage patient and visitor violence. Implications for the Profession: In the interests of safety, successful interventions to reduce violence towards general hospital nurses should be a priority for managers and healthcare organizations. Averting, mitigating and managing violence can decrease the negative professional and personal effect on nurses and ultimately improve well‐being, job satisfaction and retention rates. Furthermore, decreasing violence or aggressive incidents leads to a safer patient experience and decreased number of nursing errors ultimately improving patient experiences and outcomes. Understanding nurses' experiences of violence and working with them to explore and develop contextually relevant solutions increases their capacity to respond to and avert violent incidents. Contextually modified Safewards interventions offer one such solution and potentially has wider implications for healthcare settings beyond the specific wards studied. Impact: This study addressed the implementation of modified Safewards strategies in medical and surgical wards to prevent violence. Three themes emerged from the analysis of the pre‐implementation focus groups that reflected the type of violence experienced by these nurses and the context within which they occurred. Following the implementation of two modified Safewards interventions, the post‐implementation focus groups reported positive changes to their practices using the modified resources to prevent violence from patients and their visitors. Mental health interventions, such as those used in the Safewards model can be modified and provide a tool kit of interventions that can be used by medical and surgical nurses. Reporting Method: This paper has adhered to the COREQ guidelines. Patient or Public Contribution: No patient or public contribution. What Does this Paper Contribute to the wider Global Clinical Community?: This paper outlines and discusses the action research approach undertaken to work with general hospital nurses to modify mental health nurses' Safewards interventions into their clinical practice. This paper provides evidence of the ‘real world’ application of Safewards interventions by medical and surgical nurses in general hospital wards. This paper presents qualitative findings based on focus group methods to highlight the narratives of general nurses and their experiences of violence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Advanced Nursing
Early online date27 Feb 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 27 Feb 2024

Cite this