MIG (CXCL9) is a more sensitive measure than IFN-γ of vaccine induced T-cell responses in volunteers receiving investigated malaria vaccines

Tamara Berthoud, Susanna Dunachie, Stephen Todryk, Adrian Hill, Helen Fletcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For many years the IFN-γ ex vivo ELISPOT has been a major assay for assessing human T-cell responses generated by malaria vaccines. The ELISPOT assay is a sensitive assay, but an imperfect correlate of protection against malaria. Monokine induced by gamma (MIG), or CXCL9, is a chemokine induced by IFN-γ and has the potential to provide amplification of the IFN-γ signal. MIG secretion could provide a measure of bio-active IFN-γ and a functional IFN-γ signalling pathway. We report that detecting MIG by flow cytometry and by RT-PCR can be more sensitive than the detection of IFN-γ using these methods. We also find that there is little inter-individual variability in MIG secretion when detected by flow cytometry and that the MIG assay may be used to estimate the amount of bio-active IFN-γ present. Measurement of MIG alongside IFN-γ may provide a fuller picture of Th1 type responses post-vaccination.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-41
JournalJournal of Immunological Methods
Volume340
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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