Muscle Damage following Maximal Eccentric Knee Extensions in Males and Females

Kirsty Hicks, Gladys Onambele-Pearson, Keith Winwood, Christopher Morse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Aim:To investigate whether there is a sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. Materials and Method:Vastus Lateralis and patella tendon properties were measured in males and females using ultrasonography. During maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions (12 reps x 6 sets), Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and maximal voluntary eccentric knee extensions torque were recorded every 10° of knee joint angle (20–90°). Isometric torque, Creatine Kinase and muscle soreness were measured pre, post, 48, 96 and 168 hours post damage as markers of exercise induced muscle damage. Results:Patella tendon stiffness and Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening were significantly higher in males compared to females (p0.05). There was no sex difference in isometric torque loss and muscle soreness post exercise induced muscle damage (p>0.05). Creatine Kinase levels post exercise induced muscle damage were higher in males compared to females (p<0.05), and remained higher when maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, relative to estimated quadriceps anatomical cross sectional area, was taken as a covariate (p<0.05). Conclusion: Based on isometric torque loss, there is no sex difference in exercise induced muscle damage. The higher Creatine Kinase in males could not be explained by differences in maximal voluntary eccentric knee extension torque, Vastus Lateralis fascicle lengthening and patella tendon stiffness. Further research is required to understand the significant sex differences in Creatine Kinase levels following exercise induced muscle damage.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0150848
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Mar 2016

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