National counter-terrorism (CT) policies and challenges to human rights and civil liberties: case study of the UK

Helen Fenwick, Daniel Fenwick

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

126 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In the UK the rise post-2005 in “home-grown” terrorism, relying to a significant extent on strikes on soft targets by “self-starters,” means that the search for effective preventive measures remains a continuing concern. Below a number of the preventive counter-terror measures adopted post-9/11, and incrementally strengthened in response to the current threat, are found to fall into three categories and represent interventions at the stages in the path toward attacks. This chapter focuses on selected examples of these preventive measures. In terms of three key stages, firstly, there is the attempt to prevent radicalization, under the “Prevent” strategy. A second strategy relies on taking certain measures to control the activities of those considered likely – on the balance of probabilities – to engage in terrorist-related activity. A third preventive strategy relies on the special terrorism offences under the Terrorism Acts 2000 and 2006, as amended, intended to allow for intervention at a very early stage in terrorist plots and in preparing or instigating terrorist acts (“precursor” offences).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Human Rights and Counter-Terrorism
EditorsEran Shor, Stephen Hoadley
Place of PublicationSingapore
PublisherSpringer
Chapter12
Pages1-41
Number of pages41
ISBN (Electronic)9789811038945
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Publication series

NameInternational Human Rights
PublisherSpringer
Volume8

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'National counter-terrorism (CT) policies and challenges to human rights and civil liberties: case study of the UK'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this