New generation of artificial MicroRNA and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNA vectors for efficient gene silencing in Arabidopsis

Alberto Carbonell, Atsushi Takeda, Noah Fahlgren, Simon C Johnson, Josh T Cuperus, James C Carrington

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) and synthetic trans-acting small interfering RNAs (syn-tasiRNAs) are used for small RNA-based, specific gene silencing or knockdown in plants. Current methods to generate amiRNA or syn-tasiRNA constructs are not well adapted for cost-effective, large-scale production or for multiplexing to specifically suppress multiple targets. Here, we describe simple, fast, and cost-effective methods with high-throughput capability to generate amiRNA and multiplexed syn-tasiRNA constructs for efficient gene silencing in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and other plant species. amiRNA or syn-tasiRNA inserts resulting from the annealing of two overlapping and partially complementary oligonucleotides are ligated directionally into a zero background BsaI/ccdB-based expression vector. BsaI/ccdB vectors for amiRNA or syn-tasiRNA cloning and expression contain a modified version of Arabidopsis MIR390a or TAS1c precursors, respectively, in which a fragment of the endogenous sequence was substituted by a ccdB cassette flanked by two BsaI sites. Several amiRNA and syn-tasiRNA sequences designed to target one or more endogenous genes were validated in transgenic plants that (1) exhibited the expected phenotypes predicted by loss of target gene function, (2) accumulated high levels of accurately processed amiRNAs or syn-tasiRNAs, and (3) had reduced levels of the corresponding target RNAs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-29
Number of pages15
JournalPlant Physiology
Volume165
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2014

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