Nobody, somebody, everybody: ballet, girlhood, class, femininity and comics in 1950s Britain

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Nobody, somebody, everybody: ballet, girlhood, class, femininity and comics in 1950s Britain. / Gibson, Mel.

In: Girlhood Studies, Vol. 1, No. 2, 2008, p. 108-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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@article{c367030daa5849da99e3184b66668676,
title = "Nobody, somebody, everybody: ballet, girlhood, class, femininity and comics in 1950s Britain",
abstract = "This article looks at girlhood in an historical and culturally specific context, through close textual analysis of a central narrative from a key British girls' comic of the 1950s. Girl, published by Hulton Press, predominantly addressed issues around femininity, girlhood and class in that period, often linking reading with other activities considered “appropriate” for girls. I will explore how Girl articulates gender and class and also how it encouraged the mainly middle-class readership to make ballet an important aspect of their cultural practice, popularising ballet classes across Britain. In doing so, I shall focus on the narrative, “Belle of the Ballet.” I will also look at other texts of the period, including Bunty, launched in 1958 by DC Thomson, and show how the representation of ballet changed in later comics for girls, relating this to shifting constructions of girlhood.",
keywords = "Britain, historical context, ballet, comics, reading, cultural practices around girlhood",
author = "Mel Gibson",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.3167/ghs.2008.010207",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "108--128",
journal = "Girlhood Studies",
issn = "1938-8209",
publisher = "Berghahn Books Inc.",
number = "2",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Nobody, somebody, everybody: ballet, girlhood, class, femininity and comics in 1950s Britain

AU - Gibson, Mel

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - This article looks at girlhood in an historical and culturally specific context, through close textual analysis of a central narrative from a key British girls' comic of the 1950s. Girl, published by Hulton Press, predominantly addressed issues around femininity, girlhood and class in that period, often linking reading with other activities considered “appropriate” for girls. I will explore how Girl articulates gender and class and also how it encouraged the mainly middle-class readership to make ballet an important aspect of their cultural practice, popularising ballet classes across Britain. In doing so, I shall focus on the narrative, “Belle of the Ballet.” I will also look at other texts of the period, including Bunty, launched in 1958 by DC Thomson, and show how the representation of ballet changed in later comics for girls, relating this to shifting constructions of girlhood.

AB - This article looks at girlhood in an historical and culturally specific context, through close textual analysis of a central narrative from a key British girls' comic of the 1950s. Girl, published by Hulton Press, predominantly addressed issues around femininity, girlhood and class in that period, often linking reading with other activities considered “appropriate” for girls. I will explore how Girl articulates gender and class and also how it encouraged the mainly middle-class readership to make ballet an important aspect of their cultural practice, popularising ballet classes across Britain. In doing so, I shall focus on the narrative, “Belle of the Ballet.” I will also look at other texts of the period, including Bunty, launched in 1958 by DC Thomson, and show how the representation of ballet changed in later comics for girls, relating this to shifting constructions of girlhood.

KW - Britain

KW - historical context

KW - ballet

KW - comics

KW - reading

KW - cultural practices around girlhood

U2 - 10.3167/ghs.2008.010207

DO - 10.3167/ghs.2008.010207

M3 - Article

VL - 1

SP - 108

EP - 128

JO - Girlhood Studies

JF - Girlhood Studies

SN - 1938-8209

IS - 2

ER -