NSM CFRP prestressing techniques with strengthening potential for simultaneously enhancing load capacity and ductility performance

Mohammadali Rezazadeh*, Honeyeh Ramezansefat, Joaquim Barros

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ductility performance of reinforced concrete (RC) members strengthened with carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) reinforcement using near-surface-mounted (NSM) technique has a tendency to decrease with the increase of the prestress level applied to the CFRPs. Hence, in this study, first to assure a sufficient degree of ductility for these prestressed members, a methodology was proposed to determine the maximum prestress level that can be applied to the NSM CFRP reinforcement. Using this methodology, a simplified analytical formulation was developed to determine this maximum allowable prestress level. In the second part, after demonstrating the good predictive performance of a developed three-dimensional finite-element model, first the effect of partial unbonding of prestressed NSM CFRP reinforcement at midspan to increase the ductility performance of strengthened slabs was numerically assessed. Then, a new hybrid-partially bonded system, combining the fully bonded non-prestressed and partially bonded prestressed CFRP reinforcements in the same application according to the NSM technique, was proposed for the flexural strengthening of RC slabs. This hybrid-partially bonded system was capable of providing a better balance in terms of load-carrying and ultimate deflection capacity of prestressed strengthened slabs. At the end, a comparison between the potentialities of fully bonded, partially bonded, and hybrid-partially bonded systems for the flexural strengthening of RC structures is made, and the relevant results are presented and discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number04016029
JournalJournal of Composites for Construction
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'NSM CFRP prestressing techniques with strengthening potential for simultaneously enhancing load capacity and ductility performance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this