Nurses’ Attitudes and Perceptions towards Hand Hygiene in Mental Health and Medical Inpatient Settings: Comparative, Cross-Sectional Study

Geoffrey L. Dickens*, Charlotte Goko, Emina Ryan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Poor hand hygiene is a major contributor to hospital acquired infection. In this study, a comparison of the related attitudes of psychiatric and non-psychiatric nurses was made using a cross-sectional survey design. N = 79 nurses who work in psychiatric or non-psychiatric hospital wards completed questionnaires regarding intended compliance with hand-washing protocols and potential cognitive predictors of compliance. Perceived ease of compliance and behavioural norms, and working in a non-psychiatric ward, predicted superlative intended compliance. Working in psychiatry did not in itself predict outgroup membership suggesting that psychiatric ward-related factors, rather than psychiatric nurse-related factors are most relevant in determining between-group differences. Consideration of factors unique to psychiatry wards during service design could improve compliance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1011-1018
Number of pages8
JournalIssues in Mental Health Nursing
Volume41
Issue number11
Early online date20 Jul 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2020
Externally publishedYes

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