Objectively-assessed physical activity and self-reported activity pacing in adults with multiple sclerosis: a pilot study

Ulric S. Abonie, John Saxton, Katherine Baker, Florentina Hettinga*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective:
To examine the association between self-reported activity pacing (a strategy to manage fatigue symptoms) and objectively-measured physical activity behaviours in adults with multiple sclerosis.

Design:
Single cross-sectional study

Setting:
Multiple sclerosis rehabilitation centre in Colchester, United Kingdom.

Subjects:
Twenty-one adults (59 ± 9 years) with multiple sclerosis.

Main measures:
Physical activity behaviours (activity level: activity counts per minute; activity variability: highest activity counts per minute each day divided by activity counts per minute on that day) were measured with accelerometers. Self-reported activity pacing (Activity Pacing and Risk of Overactivity Questionnaire), fatigue severity (Fatigue Severity Scale) and health-related quality of life (RAND-12-Item Short-Form Health Survey) were measured. Scatter plots were used to explore associations between measures.

Results:
Activity level was 258 ± 133 counts per minutes, activity variability was 4 ± 1, self-reported activity pacing was 3 ± 1, fatigue severity was 5 ± 2 and health-related quality of life was 43 ± 8. Increased self-reported activity pacing was associated with lower activity levels and less variability in daily activities.

Conclusion:
This investigation suggests that people with multiple sclerosis who have low physical activity levels could be inappropriately using activity pacing as a reactionary response to their multiple sclerosis symptoms.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2692155211024135
Number of pages8
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
Early online date16 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 Jun 2021

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