Of weighty reasons and indiscriminate blankets: The retention of DNA for forensic purposes

Carole McCartney*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper explores the fallout from the decision in S & Marper v UK (2008), where the European Court of Human Rights, in ruling the UK's DNA retention regime breached human rights, was 'struck by the blanket and indiscriminate nature' of the power to retain DNA and stated that the UK Government required 'weighty reasons' to justify the retention of DNA in cases of unconvicted individuals. Since the ruling, the UK Government has drafted a new retention regime but serious doubts remain whether the issue of DNA retention will have been satisfactorily resolved.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2010 IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society
Subtitle of host publicationSocial Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10
EditorsKatina Michael
Place of PublicationPiscataway
PublisherIEEE
Pages1-8
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9781424477753, 9781424477760
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Aug 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event2010 IEEE Internationl Symposium on Technology and Society: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10 - Wollongong, NSW, Australia
Duration: 7 Jun 20109 Jun 2010

Publication series

NameInternational Symposium on Technology and Society, Proceedings

Conference

Conference2010 IEEE Internationl Symposium on Technology and Society: Social Implications of Emerging Technologies, ISTAS'10
CountryAustralia
CityWollongong, NSW
Period7/06/109/06/10

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