Oscillatory activity is not evident in the primate temporal visual cortex with static stimuli

Martin J. Tovee*, Edmund T. Rolls

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been suggested in studies in the visual system of anaesthetized cats that oscillatory activity with a frequency of 40-60 Hz occurs during the presentation of moving visual stimuli and reflects a synchronization process between neurons that could implement the binding together of related neurons into different sets. We found no evidence for such oscillations in the inferior temporal visual cortex and related areas of awake macaques fixating effective static visual stimuli, which for the neurons analysed were faces. We put forward the possibility that temporal synchronization between neurons to implement binding may not be generally used in the visual system as a solution to the binding problem, at least when static objects are being processed and recognised in higher parts of the visual system.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-372
Number of pages4
JournalNeuroReport
Volume3
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 1992
Externally publishedYes

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