‘Our citizenship is being prostituted’: The everyday geographies of economic citizenship regimes

Sarah Peck*, Daniel Hammett

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

There is much interest in economic citizenship schemes, yet little attention has been paid to the quotidian impacts of such schemes on local communities, environments and notions of citizenship. This paper responds to this lacuna by reviewing the existing literature on economic citizenship and considering what an ‘everyday geographical’ lens would add to existing theorisations. ‘Everyday geographies’ are integral to thinking about how economic citizenship regimes shape local economies, societies and environs, providing insights into the ways in which the lives of ‘ordinary citizens’ intersect with flows of capital, the growth of an (im)mobile super-rich and shifts in migration management.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalProgress in Human Geography
Early online date24 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 May 2022

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