Partnership or insanity: why do health partnerships do the same thing over and over again and expect a different result?

Neil Perkins, David J. Hunter, Shelina Visram, Rachael Finn, Jennifer Gosling, Lee Adams, Amanda Forrest

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives
The paper reports on an empirical study of Health and Wellbeing Boards (HWBs) in England. Established by the Health and Social Care Act 2012, HWBs act as place-based hubs for leaders in health, social care, local government and other sectors to come together to address health improvement and the wider determinants of health.

Methods
We conducted a three-year study of HWBs (2015–2017) in five localities across England. This involved collecting qualitative data from semi-structured interviews with key actors in the HWBs at strategic and operational levels, and focus group sessions with voluntary-sector participants at each HWB.

Results
HWBs have largely followed the path of previous partnerships in terms of a lack of clear aims and objectives, lack of ownership and accountability by partners, and an absence of any significant impact on health outcomes.

Conclusions
Many of the features of unsuccessful partnership working were largely displayed by HWBs. Boards require more executive power and ownership from the bottom up if they are to have any real impact.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-48
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Health Services Research & Policy
Volume25
Issue number1
Early online date28 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Jan 2020
Externally publishedYes

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