Pass the ball: Enforced turn-taking in activity tracking

John Rooksby, Mattias Rost, Alistair Morrison, Matthew Chalmers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

27 Citations (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

We have developed a mobile application called Pass The Ball that enables users to track, reflect on, and discuss physical activity with others. We followed an iterative design process, trialling a first version of the app with 20 people and a second version with 31. The trials were conducted in the wild, on users' own devices. The second version of the app enforced a turn-taking system that meant only one member of a group of users could track their activity at any one time. This constrained tracking at the individual level, but more successfully led users to communicate and interact with each other. We discuss the second trial with reference to two concepts: Social relatedness and individual-competence. We discuss six key lessons from the trial, and identify two high-level design implications: Attend to "practices" of tracking; and look within and beyond "collaboration" and "competition" in the design of activity trackers.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI 2015 - Proceedings of the 33rd Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherACM
Pages2417-2426
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781450331456
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2015
Externally publishedYes
Event33rd Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015 - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: 18 Apr 201523 Apr 2015

Conference

Conference33rd Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI 2015
CountryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period18/04/1523/04/15

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