Peace education, militarism and neo-liberalism: conceptual reflections with empirical findings from the UK

Hartmut Behr, Nick Megoran, Jane Carnaffan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

This article explores ‘peace days’ in English schools as a form of peace education. From a historical overview of academic discussions on peace education in the US and Great Britain since the First World War, we identify three key factors important for peace education: the political context, the place in which peace days occur and pedagogical imperatives of providing a certain narrative of the sources of violence in politics. Although contemporary militarism and neoliberalism reduce the terrains for peace studies in English schools, peace days allow teachers to carve out spaces for peace education. Peace days in Benfield School, Newcastle and Comberton Village College, Cambridgeshire, are considered as case studies. We conclude with reflections on the opportunities and limitations of this approach to peace education, and on how peace educators and activists could enlarge its reach.

Keywords: Peace education, UK, militarisation, neoliberalism
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)76-96
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Peace Education
Volume15
Issue number1
Early online date1 Nov 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

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