Physical activity practice during COVID-19 pandemic in patients with intermittent claudication

Raphael Mendes Ritti-Dias*, Gabriel Grizzo Cucato, Max Duarte de Oliveira, Heloisa Amaral Braghieri, Juliana Ferreira de Carvalho, Nelson Wolosker, Marilia de Almeida Correia, Hélcio Kanegusuku

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
To describe physical activity habits and barriers for physical activity practice in patients with peripheral artery disease and claudication symptoms during Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

METHODS:
In this cross-sectional survey study, 127 patients with peripheral artery disease (59.8% men; 68±9 years old; and 81.9% had the peripheral artery disease diagnosis ≥5 years old) were included. The physical activity habits and barriers for physical activity practice were assessed through telephone interview using a questionnaire with questions related to: (a) COVID-19 personal care; (b) overall health; (c) physical activity habits; (d) for those who were inactive, the barriers for physical activity practice.

RESULTS:
Only 26.8% of patients reported practicing physical activity during the COVID-19 pandemic. Exercise characteristics more common among these patients include walking, performed at least 5 days a week, during 31–60 min at light intensity. In contrast, among physically inactive patients, pain, injury or disability (55%), the COVID-19 pandemic (50%), the need to rest due to leg pain (29%), and lack of energy (27%) were the most frequent barriers to physical activity practice.

CONCLUSION:
The physical activity level of patients with peripheral artery disease is impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-39
Number of pages5
JournalRevista da Associacao Medica Brasileira
Volume67
Issue numbersuppl 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Aug 2021

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