Police interviews with suspected child sex offenders: Does use of empathy and question type influence the amount of investigation relevant information obtained?

Gavin Oxburgh, James Ost, Julie Cherryman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using transcripts of 26 real-life interviews with suspected child sex offenders from England, this study examined the use of empathy and the impact of question type on the amount of investigation relevant information (IRI) obtained. There were no significant differences in the amount of IRI obtained in the interviews as a function of the use of empathy by police officers. The mean proportion of inappropriate questions was significantly higher than the mean proportion of appropriate questions and, as hypothesized, the responses to appropriate questions contained significantly more items of IRI than responses to inappropriate questions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)259-273
Number of pages15
JournalPsychology, Crime and Law
Volume18
Issue number3-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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