Policy and transitions to training and work for disabled young people in the UK: Neo-liberalism for better and for worse?

Scott Yates, Alan Roulstone

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    30 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Although New Labour distanced itself from the neo-liberal ‘underclass’ discourses of its predecessors, its approach to disabled young people maintained key aspects of neo-liberalism, particularly an emphasis on individuals’ human capital, aspirations and self-investments as causes of and solutions to disabled young people’s unemployment. This is also apparent in early Coalition government statements. Since the 1990s, policies have focused on providing individually-tailored advice, developing individuals’ skills, and motivating appropriate self-investment. We examine recent evidence that highlights a number of problems with this focus. Notably, it entails a simplistic and individualised notion of ‘barriers’ to employment that cannot account for the complex impacts of disablement and inequality; moves towards open-market models of training and work support create perverse incentives that divert support away from those most in need; employment success is dependent on unpredictable local opportunity structures; and the focus on paid employment undermines other social contributions made by disabled young people.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)456-470
    JournalDisability and Society
    Volume28
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Policy and transitions to training and work for disabled young people in the UK: Neo-liberalism for better and for worse?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this