Post Space Mission Lumbo-Pelvic Neuromuscular Reconditioning: A European Perspective

Simon Evetts, Nick Caplan, Dorothée Debuse, Gunda Lambrecht, Volker Damann, Nora Petersen, Julie Hides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-duration exposure to the space environment causes physical adaptations that are deleterious to optimal functioning on Earth. Post-mission rehabilitation traditionally concentrates on regaining general muscle strength, neuromuscular control, and lumbo-pelvic stability. A particular problem is muscle imbalance caused by the hypertrophy of the flexor and atrophy of the extensor and local lumbo-pelvic muscles, increasing the risk of post-mission injury. A method currently used in European human spaceflight to aid post-mission recovery involves a motor control approach, focusing initially on teaching voluntary contraction of specific lumbo-pelvic muscles and optimizing spinal position, progressing to functional retraining in weight bearing positions. An alternative approach would be to use a Functional Readaptive Exercise Device to appropriately recruit this musculature, thus complementing current rehabilitation programs. Advances in post-mission recovery of this nature may both improve astronaut healthcare and aid terrestrial healthcare through more effective treatment of low back pain and accelerated post bed rest rehabilitation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)764-765
JournalAviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine
Volume85
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

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