Presenting Physical Things Digitally: New Collecting Practices

DBP Harrison, Richard Banks, Tim Regan, Martin Grayson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The motivations for collecting and the idiosyncrasies of physical and digital collections have been long studied. However, how they are presented in the digital space is an unresolved challenge. To help better understand this problem from a design perspective, we built Thinga.Me. Thinga.Me is a system which allows users to capture photographs of physical objects and then cut them out, place them into digital collections, and share them. By segmenting the object from the background the interface creates the illusion of a physical item, giving a sense of carrying your stuff with you in your pocket. Following two years of development, iteration and feedback, we discuss uses of the app and the implications it can have for changing the way we reflect on physical things in our lives. In particular, we focus on how digital collection are presented and displayed in a realistic way as a way of providing more meaning and helping shape users’ identities. Demonstrating the importance of visual design choices, our results lead to considerations on how to most appropriately display physical objects in the virtual world, whilst avoiding the uncanniness some might experience when interacting with skeuomorphic collections.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationResearch Through Design 2017
PublisherRTD
Pages389-405
Number of pages16
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Mar 2017
Externally publishedYes
EventResearch Through Design Conference 2017: New Disciplines of Making – Shared Knowledge in Doing - National Museum of Scotland, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
Duration: 22 Mar 201724 Mar 2017
https://www.researchthroughdesign.org/2017/

Conference

ConferenceResearch Through Design Conference 2017
Abbreviated titleRTD2017
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityEdinburgh
Period22/03/1724/03/17
Internet address

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Presenting Physical Things Digitally: New Collecting Practices'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this