Process and Systems: A cohort study to evaluate the impact of service centralisation for emergency admissions with acute heart failure

Chris Wilkinson, Honey Thomas, Peter McMeekin, Chris Price

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Abstract

The aim of our study was to describe the impact of emergency care centralisation on unscheduled admissions with a primary discharge diagnosis of acute heart failure (HF). We carried out a retrospective cohort study of HF admissions 1 year before and 1 year after centralisation of three accident and emergency departments into one within a single large NHS trust. Outcomes included mortality, length of stay, readmissions, specialist inpatient input and follow-up, and prescription rates of stabilising medication. Baseline characteristics were similar for 211 patients before and for 307 following reconfiguration. Median length of stay decreased from 8 to 6 days (p=0.020) without an increase in readmissions (4.7% versus 4.2%, p=0.813). The proportion with specialist follow-up increased (60% to 72%, p=0.036). There was a trend towards decreased mortality (32.2% versus 27.7% at 90 days; p=0.266). Contact with the cardiology team was associated with decreased mortality. In conclusion, centralisation of specialist emergency care was associated with greater service efficiency and a trend towards reduced mortality.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)41-46
JournalFuture Healthcare Journal
Volume6
Issue number1
Early online date15 Feb 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019

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