Seeking consensus on a play-based intervention framework for promoting play of children with HIV/Aids in a low-resourced setting: A Delphi Study

Nyaradzai Munambah, Elelwani L. Ramugondo, Tracy Collins*, Reinie Cordier

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

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Abstract

Introduction
Implementing occupation-based practice in low-resourced settings can be challenging especially when working with children with HIV/Aids whose daily occupation of play is often affected by their health condition and other contextual factors such as poverty or stigma.

Aim
The aim of this paper is to obtain consensus from experts on the content and application of a play-based intervention for children with HIV/Aids living in a low-resourced setting.

Methods
A Delphi study involving two rounds using an online survey format was conducted with experts from the field of child development, play and/or HIV/Aids. Consensus agreement was reached when at least 70% of Delphi experts rated each item at 3 or higher on a 5-point Likert scale.

Consumer and Community Involvement
This paper is part of a multi-stage study that involved input and feedback from families of children who were born HIV/Aids, occupational therapists working with families of children with HIV/Aids, and input from local and international experts working with people with HIV/Aids.

Results
Thirty-seven experts completed the first round, and 35 completed the second round of the study. Consensus was achieved on the application of the Cooper's Model of Children's Play, techniques to be used and the structure of the intervention. Experts also agreed on the inclusion of a pre-intervention workshop as part of the play-based intervention.

Discussion and conclusion
The consensus on the content and application of a play-based intervention framework through a process of gaining expert perspectives provides confidence that the intervention planned to promote play for children with HIV/Aids living in low-resourced settings is likely to be effective.

Key Points for Occupational Therapy
Occupation-based practice is challenging when working with children with HIV/Aids in low-resourced settings.
Consensus was achieved on the play-based intervention's theoretical model, techniques to be used, and the structure.
Consensus from experts provides confidence that the intervention planned is likely to be effective.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalAustralian Occupational Therapy Journal
Early online date5 Feb 2024
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Feb 2024

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