Skin temperature, training load, and subjective muscle soreness in adolescent endurance athletes: a case study

Thomas Jones, Barry C Shillabeer, Marco Cardinale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Context: The application of infrared thermography to assess the effects of athletic training is increasing. It is not known if changes in skin temperature (Tsk) as assessed by infrared thermography are affected by the training load or the muscle soreness experienced by the athlete. Purpose: To describe the variations in Tsk in body areas affected by running training and examine any relationships with subjective ratings of muscle soreness. The secondary aim was to assess the feasibility of using infrared thermography for assessing training load in 2 junior male middle-distance athletes. Methods: Data were collected over a 42-d observational period with Tsk of the quadriceps, knees, shins, lateral hamstrings, biceps femoris, and Achilles tendons, and the subjective ratings of muscle soreness were taken each morning prior to any training. All training load was quantified through heart rate, running speed, and distance covered. Changes in Tsk outside the typical error were identified. Relationships between Tsk and subjective ratings of muscle soreness were also examined. Results: Over the 42-d observational period, mean Tsk of the regions of interest was reported outside the typical error on day 31 and day 22 for athletes 1 and 2, respectively. These changes in Tsk did not follow trends similar to those of to training loadings. No significant relationships were observed between Tsk of any regions of interest and muscle soreness. Conclusions: Although Tsk changed outside the typical error throughout the 42-d observational period, these changes were not reflective of training load quantified through cardiovascular strain or subjective ratings of muscle soreness.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1349-1352
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Volume15
Issue number9
Early online date8 Jul 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Skin temperature, training load, and subjective muscle soreness in adolescent endurance athletes: a case study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this