Slow knowledge in the ‘real world’: Using slow practice to actively engage commercial collaborators in doctoral research

Oliver Hemstock, Nick Spencer

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Abstract

Slow knowledge in design thinking and practice has potential to create value in organisations outside of the academic and artistic settings. However, its adoption is challenged by ideological tensions with the imperatives of the commercial context. This article reports on part of a practice-based doctoral research project aiming to introduce this theory into the commercial design context. The six slow design principles provide a useful framework, whilst the slow practice tools help negotiate the engagements. Preliminary findings indicate arenas where the introduction of slow knowledge can create new value for commercial organisations. This article focuses on the methods and tools employed in overcoming the challenges of introducing the theory into this setting, and conducting effective collaborations to reveal potential benefits. The mind-set of the researcher-practitioner plays a significant role in negotiating access to people and resources, and negotiating value for both the collaborator and the research imperatives.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)885-900
Number of pages5
JournalThe Design Journal
Volume22
Issue numbersup1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2019
Event13th International Conference of the European Academy of Design: Running with Scissors - Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom
Duration: 10 Apr 201912 Apr 2019
Conference number: 13
https://ead2019dundee.com/welcome/

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