Social Isolation and Loneliness of UK Veterans: A Delphi Study

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@article{e8bf7fa67724479c9dcfab1fa8348824,
title = "Social Isolation and Loneliness of UK Veterans: A Delphi Study",
abstract = "BackgroundEvidence increasingly acknowledges the impact of social isolation and loneliness on the lives of military veterans and the wider Armed Forces Community.AimsThe study gathered expert consensus to (i) understand if veterans are considered {\textquoteleft}unique{\textquoteright} in their experiences of social isolation and loneliness; (ii) examine perceived factors leading to social isolation and loneliness of veterans; (iii) identify ways to tackle veterans{\textquoteright} social isolation and loneliness.MethodsThis study adopted a three-phase Delphi method. Phase 1 utilized a qualitative approach and Phase 2 and Phase 3 utilized a mixed-methods approach.ResultsSeveral outcomes were identified across the three phases. Transition out of the military was viewed as a period to build emotional resilience and raise awareness of relevant services. It was also concluded that veterans would benefit from integrating into services within the wider community, and that social prescribing services could be a vehicle to link veterans to relevant services. Furthermore, access to, and the content of, programmes was also of importance.ConclusionsThese findings illustrate various important interventional aspects to consider when funding and implementing programmes focussed on tackling social isolation and loneliness.",
keywords = "military personnel, social isolation, veterans, loneliness",
author = "Connor Leslie and Gill McGill and Kiernan, {Matthew D.} and Gemma Wilson",
year = "2020",
month = jun,
day = "29",
doi = "10.1093/occmed/kqaa105",
language = "English",
journal = "Occupational Medicine",
issn = "0962-7480",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Social Isolation and Loneliness of UK Veterans

T2 - A Delphi Study

AU - Leslie, Connor

AU - McGill, Gill

AU - Kiernan, Matthew D.

AU - Wilson, Gemma

PY - 2020/6/29

Y1 - 2020/6/29

N2 - BackgroundEvidence increasingly acknowledges the impact of social isolation and loneliness on the lives of military veterans and the wider Armed Forces Community.AimsThe study gathered expert consensus to (i) understand if veterans are considered ‘unique’ in their experiences of social isolation and loneliness; (ii) examine perceived factors leading to social isolation and loneliness of veterans; (iii) identify ways to tackle veterans’ social isolation and loneliness.MethodsThis study adopted a three-phase Delphi method. Phase 1 utilized a qualitative approach and Phase 2 and Phase 3 utilized a mixed-methods approach.ResultsSeveral outcomes were identified across the three phases. Transition out of the military was viewed as a period to build emotional resilience and raise awareness of relevant services. It was also concluded that veterans would benefit from integrating into services within the wider community, and that social prescribing services could be a vehicle to link veterans to relevant services. Furthermore, access to, and the content of, programmes was also of importance.ConclusionsThese findings illustrate various important interventional aspects to consider when funding and implementing programmes focussed on tackling social isolation and loneliness.

AB - BackgroundEvidence increasingly acknowledges the impact of social isolation and loneliness on the lives of military veterans and the wider Armed Forces Community.AimsThe study gathered expert consensus to (i) understand if veterans are considered ‘unique’ in their experiences of social isolation and loneliness; (ii) examine perceived factors leading to social isolation and loneliness of veterans; (iii) identify ways to tackle veterans’ social isolation and loneliness.MethodsThis study adopted a three-phase Delphi method. Phase 1 utilized a qualitative approach and Phase 2 and Phase 3 utilized a mixed-methods approach.ResultsSeveral outcomes were identified across the three phases. Transition out of the military was viewed as a period to build emotional resilience and raise awareness of relevant services. It was also concluded that veterans would benefit from integrating into services within the wider community, and that social prescribing services could be a vehicle to link veterans to relevant services. Furthermore, access to, and the content of, programmes was also of importance.ConclusionsThese findings illustrate various important interventional aspects to consider when funding and implementing programmes focussed on tackling social isolation and loneliness.

KW - military personnel

KW - social isolation

KW - veterans

KW - loneliness

U2 - 10.1093/occmed/kqaa105

DO - 10.1093/occmed/kqaa105

M3 - Article

JO - Occupational Medicine

JF - Occupational Medicine

SN - 0962-7480

M1 - kqaa105

ER -