State, urban space, race: late colonialism and segregation at the Ikoyi reservation in Lagos, Nigeria

Tim Livsey*

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

This article studies the Ikoyi reservation in Lagos, Nigeria to assess changing relationships between the colonial state, urban space, and race between 1935 and 1955. Colonial authorities established reservations as special zones to house colonial officials and other white Westerners. The article shows that the Ikoyi reservation was a significant location where a wide range of actors contested relationships between statehood and race. These renegotiations contributed to making a late colonial state, a terminal form of colonial state in which explicitly racialised discourses of statehood and urban space were challenged while implicitly racialised standards and practices often persisted. Through a focus on Ikoyi, the article highlights the important relationships between segregationist projects and late colonial statehood.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)178-196
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of African History
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2022

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