Targeted therapy in patients with PIK3CA-related overgrowth syndrome

Quitterie Venot, Thomas Blanc, Smail Hadj Rabia, Laureline Berteloot, Sophia Ladraa, Jean-Paul Duong, Estelle Blanc, Simon C Johnson, Clément Hoguin, Olivia Boccara, Sabine Sarnacki, Nathalie Boddaert, Stephanie Pannier, Frank Martinez, Sato Magassa, Junna Yamaguchi, Bertrand Knebelmann, Pierre Merville, Nicolas Grenier, Dominique JolyValérie Cormier-Daire, Caroline Michot, Christine Bole-Feysot, Arnaud Picard, Véronique Soupre, Stanislas Lyonnet, Jeremy Sadoine, Lotfi Slimani, Catherine Chaussain, Cécile Laroche-Raynaud, Laurent Guibaud, Christine Broissand, Jeanne Amiel, Christophe Legendre, Fabiola Terzi, Guillaume Canaud

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

234 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

CLOVES syndrome (congenital lipomatous overgrowth, vascular malformations, epidermal naevi, scoliosis/skeletal and spinal syndrome) is a genetic disorder that results from somatic, mosaic gain-of-function mutations of the PIK3CA gene, and belongs to the spectrum of PIK3CA-related overgrowth syndromes (PROS). This rare condition has no specific treatment and a poor survival rate. Here, we describe a postnatal mouse model of PROS/CLOVES that partially recapitulates the human disease, and demonstrate the efficacy of BYL719, an inhibitor of PIK3CA, in preventing and improving organ dysfunction. On the basis of these results, we used BYL719 to treat nineteen patients with PROS. The drug improved the disease symptoms in all patients. Previously intractable vascular tumours became smaller, congestive heart failure was improved, hemihypertrophy was reduced, and scoliosis was attenuated. The treatment was not associated with any substantial side effects. In conclusion, this study provides the first direct evidence supporting PIK3CA inhibition as a promising therapeutic strategy in patients with PROS.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)540-546
Number of pages7
JournalNature
Volume558
Issue number7711
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Targeted therapy in patients with PIK3CA-related overgrowth syndrome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this