Technology as a disruptive agent: Intergenerational perspectives

Kamran Mahroof, Vishanth Weerakkody, Dilek Onkal, Zahid Hussain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
12 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study explores how British South Asian parents perceive their children’s technology consumption through their collectivist lenses and interdependent values. The findings for this qualitative study indicate that second and third generation South Asian parents acknowledge the benefits of children’s technology use; but largely perceive technology as a disruptive agent, whereby children are becoming isolated and increasingly independent within the household. The analysis aims to understand how parents view their children’s relationship with others as a result of technology consumption. Accordingly, this paper proposes an extension of the Construal of self conceptualisation and contributes a Techno-construal matrix that establishes a dyadic connection between technology consumption and cultural values. Overall, the study reveals that children display less inter-reliance and conformance typically associated with collectivist cultures, resulting from their technology use. Consequently, parents interpret their children’s shift from interdependence to more independence as a disruptive and unsettling phenomenon within the household.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)749-770
Number of pages22
JournalInformation Systems Frontiers
Volume22
Early online date31 Oct 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2020

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Technology as a disruptive agent: Intergenerational perspectives'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this