Tensions and struggles in tackling bribery at the firm level: perspectives from Buddhist-enacted organizational leaders

Mai Vu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
99 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study explores the role of an informal institution – engaged Buddhism – in leadership responses to issues of bribery at the firm level in the context of Vietnam. In-depth interviews were carried out in Vietnam with 26 organizational leaders who were Buddhist practitioners. The leaders expressed a Buddhist-enacted utilitarian approach based on three context-associated mechanisms: karmic consequences, community and social well-being, and total detachment. These mechanisms manifest in leadership approaches based on the Middle Way, Skillful Means, and Emptiness. They are involved in forming leaders’ perceptions about bribery issues and their enacting of contextual approaches to balance organizational means and ends in tackling ethical issues associated with bribery. The study also sheds light on moral struggles involved in the process of shaping and enacting a Buddhist-enacted utilitarian approach.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)517-537
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume168
Issue number3
Early online date17 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2021

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