That which we call a rose by any other name would sound as sweet: folk perceptions, status and language variation

Robert M. McKenzie, Dietmar Osthus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Folk perceptions of language diversity often differ from the criteria laid out by linguists and have particular implications for applied/sociolinguists since the collective identification of language diversity largely determines the ways in which individuals regard the categorisation of their own (and others) linguistic uses as belonging to a specific social and/or regional variety. Folk perceptions can thus help define speech communities as well as explain sociolinguistic other phenomena. This paper provides a critical analysis of the existing folk linguistic research into language variation in a number of different contexts: the UK, the USA, France and Japan. It is hoped that the information gained will help build up a more detailed sociolinguistic picture of the complex and often contradictory nature of lay individuals’ attitudes towards linguistic variation. In the final sections of the paper the authors argue for a greater deal of recognition within modern linguistics of the value of examining folk perceptions of language diversity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-115
Number of pages118
JournalApplied Folk Linguistics: AILA review
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Dec 2011

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