The advanced practitioners’ perspective. Exploring the decision‐making process between musculoskeletal advanced practitioners and their patients: An interpretive phenomenological study

Jonathan Thompson*, Lynne Gabriel, Samantha Yoward, Pamela Dawson

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction
Advanced practice roles for allied health professionals continue to expand and provide key services within pathways of care for patients with musculoskeletal conditions. Despite the extensive utilisation of these roles and previously reported high patient satisfaction, little is understood about how these practitioners interact with their patients and the factors that influence decision-making conversations.

Study
A qualitative study utilised Interpretive Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) to explore the decision-making process occurring between Advanced Practitioners (APs) and their patients in a musculoskeletal service. AP data were collected through focus groups and analysed using IPA methodology.

Conclusions
Advanced practice decision-making is a complex process and APs exhibit a range of styles, from paternalistic to shared decision-making. APs may have a personal preference, but exhibit the ability to flex between styles in consultations. Multiple themes emerged from the data that influenced the decision-making process, including AP staff understanding the importance of patient expectations and the complex factors that influence patient interactions. It is important that clinicians have an awareness of the multiple factors that contribute to the decision-making process.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalMusculoskeletal Care
Early online date16 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 16 May 2021

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