The consumer acceptance of novel vegetable-enriched bread products as a potential vehicle to increase vegetable consumption

Ditte Hobbs, A. Ashouri, Trevor George, Julie Lovegrove, Lisa Methven

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Currently UK fruit and vegetable intakes are below recommendations. Bread is a staple food consumed by approximately 95% of adults in western countries. In addition, bread provides an ideal matrix by which functionality can be delivered to the consumer in an accepted and convenient food. Therefore, enriching bread with vegetables may be an effective strategy to increase vegetable consumption. This study evaluated bread enriched with red beetroot, carrot with coriander, red pepper with tomato or white beetroot (40g vegetable per 100g) compared to white control bread (0g vegetable) for consumer acceptance. Consumers (n = 120) rated their liking of the breads overall, as well as their liking of appearance, flavour and texture using nine-point hedonic scales. Product replacement and purchase intent of the breads were rated using five-point scales. The effect of providing consumers with health information about the breads was also evaluated. There were significant differences in overall liking (P <0.0001), as well as liking of appearance (P <0.0001), flavour (P = 0.0002) and texture (P = 0.04), between the breads. However, the significant differences resulted from the red beetroot bread which was significantly (P <0.05) less liked compared to control bread. There were no significant differences in overall liking between any of the other vegetable-enriched breads compared with the control bread (no vegetable inclusion). The provision of health information about the breads did not increase consumer liking of the vegetable-enriched breads. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that vegetable-enriched bread appeared to be an acceptable strategy to increase vegetable intake, however, liking depended on vegetable type.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)15-22
JournalFood Research International
Volume58
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2014

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