The effects of lead shot deposition on soils and crops at a clay pigeon shooting site in northern England

Antony Mellor, C. McCartney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The impact of lead shot on soils and crops was examined at a clay pigeon shooting site in northern England. Topsoil cores were collected along a 300 m transect from the shooting range, and the numbers of lead shot pellets per soil core, total and ‘plant-available’(0.5m acetic acid extractable) lead concentrations, organic matter content, pH and cation exchange capacity were determined. The number of oilseed rape plants and their stem diameters were recorded in 1 m2 quadrats placed at the soil sampling locations. Total and ‘plant-available’ lead concentrations in the soil were most but plant numbers per m2 and mean stem diameters were least in the area of greatest lead shot deposition. Total lead concentrations in the soil commonly exceeded 5000 mg/kg; these are considerably greater than threshold ‘trigger’ concentrations proposed by the Department of the Environment, above which soils are considered to be contaminated and warrant further investigation. Concentrations of lead in the oilseed rape plants themselves were also largest in the area of most intense lead shot deposition; in root samples the lead concentration exceeded 400 mg/kg. The management and remediation of contaminated soils at the clay pigeon shooting site are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)124-129
JournalSoil Use and Management
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1994

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The effects of lead shot deposition on soils and crops at a clay pigeon shooting site in northern England'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this