The Exercise of External Self-Determination by Indigenous Groups: The Republic of Lakotah and the Inherent Sovereignty of American Indigenous Peoples

Sarah Sargent, Graham Melling

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Abstract

This article examines the implications of the choice made by the Republic of Lakotah to rely on international treaty law rather than the exercise of self-determination in declaring its independence from the United States in 2007 and 2010. States have long expressed resistance towards the granting of the principle of self-determination to minorities and indigenous groups. States fear that granting this right would lead to groups taking action to secede from the state. This article considers whether state fears of secession are realistic, and whether there is, in fact, a credible claim to external self-determination under international law for indigenous groups, or whether state fears of indigenous self-determination are grounded in other issues.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)49-73
Number of pages24
JournalSri Lanka Journal of International & Comparative Law
Volume1
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jul 2015
Externally publishedYes

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