The Harms and Crimes of Farming/Food

Ekaterina Gladkova*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingEntry for encyclopedia/dictionarypeer-review

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Abstract

The processes of food production and consumption illuminate the relationship between society and the natural environment as well as the inner workings of the global political economy. As a result, food has been increasingly used by scholars to explore the world, and food-focused research is a rapidly growing research area within criminology. Studies of food crime and harm challenge the legal-procedural approach in criminology by examining harmful but legal activities and challenging the limitations of the victimhood construction. Industrial farming presents a useful case study for expanding the criminological research frontiers. Although a socially normalized and even encouraged practice, it is characterized by systemic harms rooted in the normal functioning of the capitalist food system. This includes harms against more-than-human animals, the natural environment, and communities living in that environment.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationOxford Research Encyclopedias
Subtitle of host publicationCriminology and Criminal Justice: A Community of Scholars
EditorsHenry N. Pontell
Place of PublicationOxford
PublisherOxford University Press
Pages1-17
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9780190264079
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Feb 2023

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