The mosquito state: How technology, capital, and state practice mediate the ecologies of public health

Paul Robbins, Jacob C. Miller

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 2003, the mosquito acquired new significance in the southwestern United States. The arrival of west nile virus (wnV) and its first associated human deaths ushered in a rereading of the mosquito from an itchy nuisance to a potentially life-threatening hazard. Mundane objects now required attention like never before. Swimming pools, irrigation canals, ditches, clogged gutters, and abandoned tires all became potential sources of a mobile public health hazard: the mosquito vector. In the state of Arizona, wnV went from a largely unanticipated epidemic situation to an endemic one in short order, where expectation of ongoing disease control quickly became a part of government obligations (Robbins et al. 2008).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEcologies and Politics of Health
EditorsBrian King, Kelley A. Crews
Place of PublicationLondon, UK
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Chapter11
Pages196-216
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9781136295539
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2012

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