The Nature of the Self, Self-regulation and Moral Action: Implications from the Confucian Relational Self and Buddhist Non-self

Irene Chu, Mai Vu*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The concept of the self and its relation to moral action is complex and subject to varying interpretations, not only between different academic disciplines but also across time and space. This paper presents empirical evidence from a cross-cultural study on the Buddhist and Confucian notions of self in SMEs in Vietnam and Taiwan. The study employs Hwang’s Mandala Model of the Self, and its extension into Shiah’s non-self-model, to interpret how these two Eastern philosophical representations of the self, the Confucian relational self and Buddhist non-self, can lead to moral action. By demonstrating the strengths of the model, emphasizing how social and cultural influences constrain the individual self and promote the social person leading to moral action, the paper extends understanding of the self with empirical evidence of the mechanisms involved in organizational contexts.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Early online date12 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 May 2021

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