The pragmatic language, communication skills, parent–child relationships, and symptoms of children with ADHD and their playmates 18-months after a parent-delivered play-based intervention

Sarah Wilkes-Gillan*, Alycia Cantrill, Lauren Parsons, Cally Smith, Reinie Cordier

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This study examined the communication skills, pragmatic language, parent–child relationships, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms of children with ADHD and their playmates 18-months after a pilot parent-delivered intervention for improving social play skills and pragmatic language. Methods: Participants were five children with ADHD, their parents, and five typically-developing playmates. Outcomes were measured immediately post and 18-months following the intervention. Parent-rated norm-based assessments and an observational measure were used. Differences within and between the ADHD and playmate groups were examined. Results: Children maintained all skills gained 18-months following the intervention. Compared to a normative sample, children with ADHD remained below the average range on aspects of communication skills, parent–child relationships, and ADHD symptom levels 18-months following intervention. Conclusions: After intervention, children with ADHD still experienced pragmatic language skills below those of their peers on norm-based assessments that measure their skills across contexts. School-based interventions are needed to facilitate ongoing skill development and generalization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)317-322
Number of pages6
JournalDevelopmental Neurorehabilitation
Volume20
Issue number5
Early online date17 Jul 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

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