The self-regulatory role of anticipated group-based shame and guilt in inhibiting in-group favoritism

Lee Shepherd, Russell Spears, Antony Manstead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In three studies, we examined whether the anticipation of group-based guilt and shame inhibits in-group favoritism. In Studies 1 and 2, anticipated group-based shame negatively predicted in-group favoritism; in neither study did anticipated group-based guilt uniquely predict in-group favoritism. In Study 3, we orthogonally manipulated anticipated group-based shame and guilt. Here, we found that the shame (but not the guilt) manipulation had a significant inhibitory effect on in-group favoritism. Anticipated group-based shame (but not guilt) promotes egalitarian intergroup behavior.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)493-504
JournalEuropean Journal of Social Psychology
Volume43
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013

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