The uncomfortable path from forestry to tourism in Kielder, Northumberland: a socially dichotomous village?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Kielder in Northumberland is England's remotest village. From sheep-farming to commercial forestry to the creation of Kielder Reservoir, the villagers have witnessed successive dramatic environmental changes. This article is based on the Kielder Oral History project, comprising thirty-six interviews conducted by the author in October 2012. Few interviewees recall the valley before the advent of forestry in the 1920s, but most have strong opinions regarding the 250,000 tourists who visit Kielder for recreational purposes each year. many original forestry villagers now live side by side with newcomers who have moved to the area from far afield to change their lifestyles by moving to a perceived idyllic, tranquil and natural landscape boasting a strong community spirit. this article explains the marked social dichotomy between these groups.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-93
Number of pages13
JournalOral History
Volume42
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The uncomfortable path from forestry to tourism in Kielder, Northumberland: a socially dichotomous village?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this