UK’s withdrawal from Justice and Home Affairs: a historical institutionalist analysis of policy trajectories

Sarah Wolff, Agathe Piquet, Helena Farrand Carrapico*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Contrary to the idea that “Brexit means Brexit”, the article demonstrates that, in spite of leaving the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice, the United Kingdom (UK) is not automatically seeking to distance itself from the EU’s activities and approaches to these policy fields. Using the concepts of disengagement, continued engagement and re-engagement and drawing from historical institutionalism, the article further clarifies that present and future trajectories of UK positions in respect with the EU action are conditioned by a path dependence created by the evolution of UK opt-ins and opt-outs in this field, by the politicization of the Brexit negotiations in the context of the UK-EU relations, and by domestic UK politics. We explore this argument across three policy areas: 1) police and judicial cooperation, 2) immigration, borders and asylum and 3) cybersecurity.
Original languageEnglish
JournalComparative European Politics
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 9 Dec 2021

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